Tag Archives: "AbleChildAfrica"

Bertie and his Buccaneers!

Bertie is a fun, enthusiastic and cheeky 6 year old boy from the North of England. He also has Muscular Dystrophy. He lives with his Mum and Dad (Alison and Matt), who met while fundraising in Africa, and his older brother and sister. Together they are ‘Bertie’s Buccaneers’ and they work together to help to […]

Day of the African Child: Empowering us all

Written by Carl Kojo Apeagyei (@Apeagyei_), Fundraising and Events Intern As adults, many of us are used to making decisions which fundamentally alter our lives and the lives of those around us. Choices such as having children, taking a new job, getting married or leaving school are core in defining ‘What it means to be […]

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Our Youth Ambassador reflects on the World Humanitarian Summit

I have just returned from the World Humanitarian Summit where I was representing AbleChildAfrica. I had the privilege to meet young disabled activists from all over the world, and hear their inspirational stories about what they were doing to progress the rights of persons with disabilities in their own countries as well as internationally. Ivan […]

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Anthony presenting during the 'Leave No Young Person Behind' Panel Discussion

AbleChildAfrica at the DFID Youth Summit

On 12 September AbleChildAfrica Youth Advocate Anthony Ford-Shubrook and AbleChildAfrica Programmes and Advocacy Officer Jenny Bowie, joined hundreds of young people who gathered in London at the first ever Youth Summit held at the Department for International Development (DFID). The summit was designed by young people for young people and focused on the future of our world in light of the […]

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AbleChildAfrica is #UpForSchool!

AbleChildAfrica has joined the #UpForSchool campaign, which is calling on world leaders to make education a priority to ensure the 59 million out of school children gain their right to education. One out of three children who are out of school have a disability, and without focusing global efforts on tackling the barriers disabled children […]

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